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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

6 edition of Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns found in the catalog.

Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns

Kevin Foster

Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns

by Kevin Foster

  • 131 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Portland, Or. (911 N.E. 11th Ave., Portland 97232-4181) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ferns -- Hawaii,
  • Plant conservation -- Hawaii,
  • Endangered plants -- Hawaii

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesFinal recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns, Recovery plan for 4 species of Hawaiian ferns
    ContributionsRubenstein, Tanya, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationvii, 78 p.
    Number of Pages78
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13623715M
    OCLC/WorldCa39862838

    Australian tree fern (Cyathea cooperi) Hawaii Pacific Weed Risk Assessment: 16, High Risk Regulatory Status: None Prevention and Control Category: MoMISC Target Species Report this species if seen on Molokai Description Large tree fern up to 12 m (40ft) tall with large (up .   Hawaii's Ferns and Fern Allies is the first comprehensive survey of Hawaii's ferns to be published in more than years. The book covers endemic, indigenous, and naturalized ferns and fern allies (including rare and endangered taxa), providing dichotomous keys, basionyms and synonyms, technical descriptions and distributions, a glossary, and statistical s: 7.

    Hawaiian Names: Kupukupu is a general name for ferns on a single stem. [11] Palapalai is a Niʻihau name. Pāmoho is also the Hawaiian name for an indigenous spleenwort fern Asplenium unilaterale. Background Information There is a hybrid with the native Nephrolepis exaltata and the introduced Nephrolepis multiflora known as Nephrolepis x. The flowers can be used for a dramatic haku lei (lei poʻo). [4] The dried woody capsules and bracts can be used in dry flower arrangements. Additional References [1] "Recovery Plan for Caesalpinia kavaiense & Kokia drynarioides," pages 6, 11, 18, 19, 21,

    Description: A very rare group of plants, comprised of four species within the endemic genus Nothocestrum. The wood of this plant is generally soft with a light brown to grayish-white bark. In closed mature stands of Metrosideros rain forests, one can often find tree saplings of the associated tree species mentioned above. These grow scattered among the tree ferns, which usually dominate the undergrowth. Virtually absent are saplings of the canopy species, M. r, quite commonly, numerous small Metrosideros seedlings appear on tree fern trunks and on moss-covered.


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Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns by Kevin Foster Download PDF EPUB FB2

Summary: This recovery plan covers four Hawaiian ferns that were added to the Federal list of endangered and threatened species by a final rule published on Septem (U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS] a). Get this from a library. Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns.

[Kevin Foster; Tanya Rubenstein; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.]. Get this from a library. Technical/agency draft recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.]. 24 rows  Final Recovery Plan for Four Species of Hawaiian Ferns: F: 1: Pacific Islands Fish and.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability. Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns.

By Kevin. Foster, Tayna. Rubenstein and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Abstract "March "--P. [4] of ed by Kevin Foster and Tayna es bibliographical references (p. ).Mode of access: Internet Ferns. Publisher: Portland, Or. ( N.E. 11th Ave., Portland. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http.

Technical/agency draft recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns / published by U. Fish and Wildlife Service United States. Fish and Wildlife Service Portland, Or.: U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service, View library catalogue entry. Second Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Hawaiian Waterbirds, 2ndRevision • May iv species.

The moorhen and stilt each have a recovery priority number of 9, reflecting a moderate degree of threat, a high potential for recovery, and their taxonomic rank as a subspecies.

Ferns are non-flowering vascular plants with true leaves in the Division Pteridophyta. Fern leaves are known as fronds, and they uncoil from tight spirals known as fiddleheads. Listed below are some of the ferns found in Hawaii. Flora Recovery Plan: Threatened Tasmanian Ferns.

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Hobart. (book) Abbreviations. ALCT Aboriginal Land Council of Tasmania. CAR Comprehensive, Adequate and Representative (Reserve System) 2 An additional four fern species listed as rare on the TSP Act have been flagged for.

The Hawaiian Islands are well known for having one of the highest documented percentages of endemic plants in the world. Hawaiian ferns and lycophytes represent a relatively large percentage of the endemic flora with approximately 74% of the native fern and lycophyte species considered endemic.

In addition, at least 40 taxa are naturalized aliens. We present a new synopsis of the Hawaiian fern. Ancient Hawaiian civilization: a series of lectures delivered at the Kamehameha schools / by E.S. Craig Hawaiian heritage plants / by Angela Kay Kepler; Recovery plan for four species of Hawaiian ferns [microform] Ancient Hawaiian civilization: a series of lectures delivered at the Kamehameha Schools / by Handy [and.

Special Features and Information. General Information Cibotium belong to the family Cibotiaceae. [12] Worldwide there are nine species of Cibotium, four of which are endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.[16] Etymology The generic name Cibotium is from the Greek kibotion, diminutive of kibotos, a box or casket, in reference to the indusium, a part of the fern blade that covers the sorus (spores).

one of more than species of tree ferns, descendants of prehistoric vegetation found worldwide in semi-wet to wet forests from sea level to over ft elevation.

Häpu‘u was once common in wetter areas of all the major Hawaiian islands. Until recently, large numbers of Hawaiian tree ferns were harvested for orchid media and landscape use. On O`ahu, the Hawaiian coot population has fluctuated between approximately and 1, birds in recent years (HDOFAW ).

O`ahu’s extensive coastal wetlands provide excellent habitat for Hawaiian coots, and the species occurs less frequently on interior reservoirs such as Lake Wilson and Nu`uanu Reservoir. Fork ferns and whisk ferns. Fork fern (Tmesipteris tannenisis). Photo: Jeremy Rolfe. Fork ferns (Tmesipteris) are epiphytic and have creeping stems but no roots.

The leathery forked leaves are spirally arranged around the stem and sporangia are fused in pairs on the upper surface of the leaves. There are four species of fork fern in New Zealand.

Hawaiian ferns and lycophytes represent a relatively large percentage of the endemic flora with approximately 74% of the native fern and lycophyte species considered endemic. In addition, at least. Recovery was almost immediatewithin a few months after the fallout.

In this habitat also, a large number of shrub speciessurvived, namely, nine native and three exotic species (Table 5). Also,the two tree ferns plus two herbaceous ferns (Nephrolepishirsutulaand Pteridium decompositum)were among thesurvivors. Kupukupu is a medium-sized terrestrial or epiphytic fern smaller pinnae (frondlets) about 1–1 stolons that spread out across the surface of the soil or growth medium and may climb trees or tree ferns.

Ornamentals and Flowers Sept. OF Kupukupu Fern Kent Sadanaga and Kent Kobayashi Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences K. Summary. This Recovery Plan addresses the conservation requirements of fourteen Tasmanian threatened ferns that are currently listed on the schedules of the Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act (TSP Act) or Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC Act; Table 1).

The Plan relies heavily upon the work of Michael Garrett and other fern.Except for Hedyotis,they occurred around thecrater on all four transects. These species had advanced most on theeast side (transects a and d).

On transect a they were found from 72 m(Dubautia)to m (Vaccinium)inward; on transect d theywere found between 34 m (Dubautia)and 51 m (Vaccinium)inward. Much additional information on Hawaiian flowering plants can be found in the "Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawai'i" by W.

L. Wagner, D. R. Herbst, & S. H. Sohmer. Likewise, for ferns and fern allies, a complete treatment can be found in the recently published "Hawai'i's Ferns and Fern Allies" (Daniel D. Palmer, Univ. of Hawai'i Press, ).